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Joint Contaminated Surface Detector (JCSD)


The Joint Contaminated Surface Detector (JCSD) is an optical chemical sensor that provides non-contact, near real-time detection and identification of surface-deposited solid and liquid contaminants from a moving host vehicle.  The JCSD was developed to improve the speed and capability of chemical reconnaissance and survey missions by replacing the current Double Wheel Sample System (DWSS).  Target surfaces are illuminated by laser light and contaminants in the field of view are identified through analysis of the backscattered light.  The sensor employs highly sensitive UV Raman spectroscopy to achieve rapid-time-to-detect, high probability of detection and a low false alarm rate at the highest vehicle speeds allowed by the terrain.

The JCSD has been tested at vehicle speeds exceeding 45 mph and on surfaces including concrete, asphalt, gravel, sand dirt, vegetation, mud, ice and snow.  Its onboard target library enables it to detect and identify chemical warfare agents, toxic industrial chemicals, advanced chemical threats, precursors and breakdown products.

 

Capabilities

Performance has been verified by surety lab measurements against threat chemicals and simulant field trials over a wide variety of terrain types at terrain dependent speeds up to 45+ mph (Proc. SPIE 7698, 76980A (2010)).

 

 

Features

The modes of operation include:
  • Training Mode
  • Start-up
  • Built-in-Test (BIT)
  • Confidence Check
  • Standby
  • Operate
  • Shutdown

When in Operate mode, the operator is alerted by both visual and audible alarms. The sensor can be operated standalone by a single operator using the CAPPS unit’s touch screen display or remotely via a local vehicle Ethernet-based network.

The library of targets and interferents may be selected by the user. 

Training support is available.

 

Contact

Bruce Townsend
Program Manager
(505) 889-7095
bruce.townsend@exelisinc.com

Additional Information
http://www.cugractd.rdecom.army.mil/

Proc. SPIE 7698, 76980A (2010)

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